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on the hunt for good art

Seonna Hong: Things Will Get Better

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Seonna Hong is an artist based in LA who has a solo show called Things Will Get Better at Hashimoto Contemporary. Her work is also featured in The Jealous Curator aka Danielle Krysa’s new book: A Big Important Art Book – Now With Women.

“This show is about reckoning. I found myself in the last couple years being overwhelmed by what was happening in the world and it forced me to rethink my place in it as a woman, a person of color, a mother, and as a citizen. I looked for inspiration in people around me, their activism, their work, their humanity and I found hope and community in that.”

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via The Jealous Curator 

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Sanya Kantarovsky: Give Up the Ghost

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Sanya Kantarovsky is a Russian-born, New York- based artist who recently showed at the Baltic Triennial 13 in Livnius. I am super impressed with this relatively young artist’s work. 

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“The dark humor consistent in Kantarovsky’s work across a variety of mediums pits the sumptuous against the abject and thrusts private space – be it physical or psychological – into public view. Evoking the feeling of an uneasy inner monologue, figures are gawked at, exposed, poked, or spooned medicine. They interact with one another, as well as the edges of the canvas itself, testing the confines of their given bodies and their given frame. Similarly, Kantarovsky probes their art historical predecessors: both canonical and relatively unknown painters, writers and illustrators. The presence of these references simultaneously questions and indulges in a lineage of painterly impulses.” – Dina Akhmadeeva

 

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“Lush, moody, touching, and wry, the paintings of Sanya Kantarovsky (*1982) offer a strange form of address… These are saturated images, built up from washes of color, layers of references, sly nods to our contemporary moment, and the self-conscious stylistic inflections of painters of yesteryear. One senses that their maker believes in the urgency but also the absurdity of painting as he assembles marks that are not afraid to be imperfect, even awkward. They make almost palpable such emotions as alienation, embarrassment, intimacy, and desire, exposing quotidian human melodrama and existential cruelty, all while being able to laugh at themselves as they turn to you so that you may laugh, too.” –Kunsthalle Basel

 

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via Contemporary Arts Daily

Photos via Luhring Augustine, Modern Art, Tanya Leighton Gallery

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New Work by Sabine Finkenauer

Friday, September 28, 2018

Exciting work from 2017 -2018 by the Barcelona-based Sabine Finkenauer

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Artist Crush: Meg Lipke

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

I just love this first piece by Meg Lipke of Brooklyn which is somehow so multi-faceted yet totally coherent as a whole. These vibrant ‘soft’ paintings are made with muslin, acrylic, ink, fabric dye, beeswax and stuffed with polyfil. Lipke has a very interesting back story: she is a third-generation textile artist. You can read more about that below.

 

“Lipke’s use of textiles is indubitably connected to her personal history. Her grandfather owned a textile factory in Manchester, England, and Lipke’s grandmother, Patricia Sinclair Hall, was an artist who weaved thread using a loom she hand-fashioned from plumbing pipes. She also painted fabrics and used batik, crafts she passed to Lipke’s mother, Catherine Hall, and which Lipke incorporates into her own painting today. Lipke’s mother brought the handmade loom from England to Brooklyn, and Lipke has used its warp and weft to add lines and layers of color to her paintings. In her introductory essay to the catalog accompanying this exhibit, Julia Kunin writes that, as a third-generation fiber artist, Lipke brings together ‘the physical, the personal and the historical.’ ” – Freight + Volume

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Eva LeWitt

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Eva LeWitt’s deceptively simple and refreshing work is made of some unusual materials: polyurethane foam, latex and plastic.

The artist stated: “My inspiration always comes from the materials themselves. I have often gravitated towards soft, synthetic, colorful materials; plastic bags, sponges, yarn, tape, etc. I struggled for a time using traditional sculptural materials such as plywood, steel, fiberglass. But these materials hurt me—literally and figuratively. I prefer to work in complete solitude, and I physically could not manage these materials alone. I could not dominate them or manipulate them the ways I wanted to. That is why I choose soft, tactile, materials. I want to be able to control and transform the materials.” – Artsy via Sight Unseen.

If you consider traditional materials like marble and steel or bronze as inherently masculine in both in the physical labor necessary to work with such materials as well as the message and tone they transmit, it makes perfect sense why LeWitt, a young female artist would seek out a softer, freer lexicon for her art.

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via Sight Unseen, Freize and Oslo gallery VI,VII.

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Atelier CPH for Junique

Monday, August 27, 2018

Atelier CPH  is a creative studio in Copenhagen run by Sara Ingemann and Mandy Rep. Ingemann and Rep have worked with design heavy-hitters like Kinfolk, Oak MagazineFerm Living and Menu. This Bauhaus- inspired print series was created by Atelier CPH for paper goods shop Junique.

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