Art Hound, a guide to living with art Art Hound

on the hunt for good art

Claire Colette: Mountains, Times, and Other Devices

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Claire Colette is an LA-based artist whose show Mountains, Times, and Other Devices is currently running at Ochi Projects

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“Mountains, Time, and Other Devices is an investigation into darkness, light, time, and mysticism. A series of quiet, abstract landscapes consider concepts of interconnectedness relating to land, the cosmos, and the self… Inspired by pantheism and pagan culture’s relationship to the natural world, seasons and the solar system, Colette’s imagined universes feature suns and moons floating over mountain range silhouettes held within painted frames — suggesting a multitude of worlds, cosmos or a scene from another planet altogether.” – Ochi Projects

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This last pairing is from the show Binder of Women at Guerrero Gallery. 

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Photos courtesy of the artist, Ochi Projects and Guerrero Gallery.

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Artist Crush: Pace Taylor

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Pace Taylor is an artist in Portland, Oregon.

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Jenny McGee Dougherty

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Jenny McGee Dougherty is an artist, curator and arts organizer based in Portland, Maine. Her work can be found on the online gallery Tappan Collective.

“I am interested in the intersection of humans and their environment, both natural and built. The repetitive use of public spaces and the marks that are made, both intentionally and unintentionally, over time become a living record of the movements and actions of individuals collectively inhabiting this space. Within our understanding of the allotment of space, we often overlook the places that we use the most, while also dismissing these spaces as utilitarian or banal. When graffiti gets covered up with several shades of a neutral color, a new image and a new meaning becomes part of our landscape. I am interested in how these places that belong to everyone get woven together and how they evolve as metaphor.”

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Seonna Hong: Things Will Get Better

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Seonna Hong is an artist based in LA who has a solo show called Things Will Get Better at Hashimoto Contemporary. Her work is also featured in The Jealous Curator aka Danielle Krysa’s new book: A Big Important Art Book – Now With Women.

“This show is about reckoning. I found myself in the last couple years being overwhelmed by what was happening in the world and it forced me to rethink my place in it as a woman, a person of color, a mother, and as a citizen. I looked for inspiration in people around me, their activism, their work, their humanity and I found hope and community in that.”

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via The Jealous Curator 

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Sanya Kantarovsky: Give Up the Ghost

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Sanya Kantarovsky is a Russian-born, New York- based artist who recently showed at the Baltic Triennial 13 in Livnius. I am super impressed with this relatively young artist’s work. 

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“The dark humor consistent in Kantarovsky’s work across a variety of mediums pits the sumptuous against the abject and thrusts private space – be it physical or psychological – into public view. Evoking the feeling of an uneasy inner monologue, figures are gawked at, exposed, poked, or spooned medicine. They interact with one another, as well as the edges of the canvas itself, testing the confines of their given bodies and their given frame. Similarly, Kantarovsky probes their art historical predecessors: both canonical and relatively unknown painters, writers and illustrators. The presence of these references simultaneously questions and indulges in a lineage of painterly impulses.” – Dina Akhmadeeva

 

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“Lush, moody, touching, and wry, the paintings of Sanya Kantarovsky (*1982) offer a strange form of address… These are saturated images, built up from washes of color, layers of references, sly nods to our contemporary moment, and the self-conscious stylistic inflections of painters of yesteryear. One senses that their maker believes in the urgency but also the absurdity of painting as he assembles marks that are not afraid to be imperfect, even awkward. They make almost palpable such emotions as alienation, embarrassment, intimacy, and desire, exposing quotidian human melodrama and existential cruelty, all while being able to laugh at themselves as they turn to you so that you may laugh, too.” –Kunsthalle Basel

 

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via Contemporary Arts Daily

Photos via Luhring Augustine, Modern Art, Tanya Leighton Gallery

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New Work by Sabine Finkenauer

Friday, September 28, 2018

Exciting work from 2017 -2018 by the Barcelona-based Sabine Finkenauer

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