Art Hound, a guide to living with art Art Hound

on the hunt for good art

New Work by Sabine Finkenauer

Friday, September 28, 2018

Exciting work from 2017 -2018 by the Barcelona-based Sabine Finkenauer

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Artist Crush: Meg Lipke

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

I just love this first piece by Meg Lipke of Brooklyn which is somehow so multi-faceted yet totally coherent as a whole. These vibrant ‘soft’ paintings are made with muslin, acrylic, ink, fabric dye, beeswax and stuffed with polyfil. Lipke has a very interesting back story: she is a third-generation textile artist. You can read more about that below.

 

“Lipke’s use of textiles is indubitably connected to her personal history. Her grandfather owned a textile factory in Manchester, England, and Lipke’s grandmother, Patricia Sinclair Hall, was an artist who weaved thread using a loom she hand-fashioned from plumbing pipes. She also painted fabrics and used batik, crafts she passed to Lipke’s mother, Catherine Hall, and which Lipke incorporates into her own painting today. Lipke’s mother brought the handmade loom from England to Brooklyn, and Lipke has used its warp and weft to add lines and layers of color to her paintings. In her introductory essay to the catalog accompanying this exhibit, Julia Kunin writes that, as a third-generation fiber artist, Lipke brings together ‘the physical, the personal and the historical.’ ” – Freight + Volume

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Eva LeWitt

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Eva LeWitt’s deceptively simple and refreshing work is made of some unusual materials: polyurethane foam, latex and plastic.

The artist stated: “My inspiration always comes from the materials themselves. I have often gravitated towards soft, synthetic, colorful materials; plastic bags, sponges, yarn, tape, etc. I struggled for a time using traditional sculptural materials such as plywood, steel, fiberglass. But these materials hurt me—literally and figuratively. I prefer to work in complete solitude, and I physically could not manage these materials alone. I could not dominate them or manipulate them the ways I wanted to. That is why I choose soft, tactile, materials. I want to be able to control and transform the materials.” – Artsy via Sight Unseen.

If you consider traditional materials like marble and steel or bronze as inherently masculine in both in the physical labor necessary to work with such materials as well as the message and tone they transmit, it makes perfect sense why LeWitt, a young female artist would seek out a softer, freer lexicon for her art.

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via Sight Unseen, Freize and Oslo gallery VI,VII.

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Atelier CPH for Junique

Monday, August 27, 2018

Atelier CPH  is a creative studio in Copenhagen run by Sara Ingemann and Mandy Rep. Ingemann and Rep have worked with design heavy-hitters like Kinfolk, Oak MagazineFerm Living and Menu. This Bauhaus- inspired print series was created by Atelier CPH for paper goods shop Junique.

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Paolo Del Toro

Thursday, August 23, 2018

Paolo Del Toro

“Paolo Del Toro is a British-born artist currently residing in the US. Originally trained as an illustrator, he began teaching himself sculpture and woodcarving in 2011… After settling in the US three years ago, Paolo was able to start making larger sculptures and began to experiment with felt. His current pieces are made of foam and needle felted wool.”

The artist describes his work as “obscuring the boundary between beauty and ugliness, the safe and the dangerous, the inviting and the repelling, the familiar and the foreign, the graceful and the grotesque…”

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Sculpture in wood

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via this is colossal

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Artist Crush: Hye Young

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Hye Young is an illustrator and painter from Korea with a loose, experimental approach to painting forgoing details and keeping planes flat and barely formed. Young has a knack for beautiful, dynamic compositions that reveal tension beneath the surface.

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