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Artist Cheat-Sheet: Kandinsky

April 28th, 2010 · 7 Comments

Perhaps you’ve lamented the fact that your love of Picasso won’t help you in the pursuit of living with art, but with a bit of guidance you can start to develop your taste on current art based on your preferences of “famous” art.

In this series I match major artists of the 19th or 20th century with current independent artists who share the artist’s style, subject, tone, etc. You’ll no longer have the excuse of not knowing any current, affordable artists you like!

Wassily Kandinsky is a Russian painter of the early 20th century who is considered a major pioneer of abstract art. He briefly taught at the Bauhaus School in Germany before permanently moving to France. From the 1920’s on, Kandinsky painted and wrote theory about abstract, geometric art while the formal art world revolved around the then popular genres of Impressionism and Cubism.

If you like Kandinsky’s early semi-abstract work…

…then you should check out the work of artist, Brandi Strickland, of Charlotte, NC.

If you like Kandinsky’s highly-geometric work…

…then check out Bay Area artist, Lena Wolff‘s, serene, geometric work.

If you like Kandinsky’s more abstract work with organic forms…

…then take a look at the work of the Cleveland-based Dana Oldfather

…and the San Francisco-based abstract painter, Jessica Snow.

If Kandinsky’s late-stage, more chaotic work appeals to you…

…then, again, check out Jessica Snow

…and the unusual mixed media pieces of Valerie Anne Molnar.

And lastly, if you like Kandinsky’s hyper-bright, hyper-graphic work…

…then take a look at the work of Brooklyn painter, Beau Chamberlain

…and fellow Brooklynite, Mike Perry.

Previous cheat-sheets: Georgia O’Keeffe, Gustav Klimt, Roy Lichtenstein

Artist Cheat Sheet: Roy Lichtenstein

April 5th, 2010 · 2 Comments

Perhaps you’ve lamented the fact that your love of Picasso won’t help you in the pursuit of living with art, but with a bit of guidance you can start to develop your taste on current art based on your preferences of “famous” art.

In this series I match major artists of the 19th or 20th c. with current independent artists who share the artist’s style, subject, tone, etc. You’ll no longer have the excuse of not knowing any current, affordable artists you like!

Roy Lichtenstein was an iconic American artist of the 20th century who was part of the Pop Art movement with Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, Jasper Johns and others. Lichtenstein is known for his large-scale paintings that resemble popular comics, down to the individually-painted dots depicting the then-popular half-tone printing technique. His work is filled with irony, both of the art world and ’50s and ’60s popular culture.

If you like Lichtenstein’s work on beauty and femininity…

… then you should check out Amanda Wachob’s work exploring ideals of beauty and self-image…

… and Jason Bryant‘s exquisitely-detailed paintings of old-school Hollywood starlets.

If you like his work on mid-century domesticity…

… then you might like the ironic and technically-adept work of Kelly Reemtsen.

If you like Lichtenstein for the stereotypes he mocks…

… then check out the fabulously tongue-in-cheek portraits of Martha Rich

the heavily pop art-influenced, Scot Lefavor

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…and Greg Gossel.

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And if you like Lichtenstein’s work exploring gender dynamics…

… you should check out the mythological work of collage-r, Lillianna Pereira


…and print-maker and mixed-media artist, Scot Lefavor.

Previous cheat-sheets: Georgia O’Keeffe, Gustav Klimt

Artist Cheat Sheet: Gustav Klimt

March 23rd, 2010 · 12 Comments

Say you’re not super knowledgeable about art, but you do know you love _______ (enter famous artist here). Perhaps you’ve lamented the fact that your love of Picasso won’t help you in the pursuit of living with art, but I would disagree! With a bit of guidance you can start to develop your taste on current (and affordable) art based on your preferences of “famous” art.

Here’s how this series works: each time I match a major artist of the 19th or 20th c. (e.g. Henri Matisse, Mark Rothko, Keith Haring) with current independent artists who share the artist’s style, subject, etc. Although there’s nothing wrong with museum prints, you’ll no longer have the excuse of not knowing any current, affordable artists you like!

If you love Klimt for his feminine, detailed portraits such as Mada Primavesi

…then you should definitely check out Amanda Blake (top row), Elizabeth Bauman (middle row) and Vivienne Strauss (bottom row).

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If you like Klimt’s indulgent, sensuous work like Water Snakes II

…then you might also like Audrey Kawasaki‘s paintings (below) which are also female-centric and erotic, but with a modern, manga comic twist.

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If you like Klimt’s romantic work like his world-famous painting, The Kiss

…then you might like Australian artist, Eveline Tarunadjaja‘s girly, romantic work.

If you like Klimt’s darker, more abstract work like Jurisprudence

…then you might also like the work of Stella im Hultberg with its similar stylistic elements and beautiful but edgy feel.

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And, if you like many people you love Klimt’s landscapes like Birch Forest

…then you should check out Lisa Congdon‘s graphic landscapes.

Please feel free to leave suggestions for future artists.

Previous cheat-sheet: Georgia O’Keeffe

NEW SERIES! Artist Cheat Sheet: Georgia O’Keeffe

March 4th, 2010 · 10 Comments

SAY you’re not super knowledgeable about art, but you do know you love _______ (enter famous artist here). You may have observed that your love of Picasso or Klimt won’t do you much good in the pursuit of living with art; the truth is you probably aren’t going to fork over millions to park these artists’ paintings in your den. However, with a bit of guidance, you can draw on these preferences as a means to develop your taste on current (and affordable) art.

This series will help you do just that: each week I’ll match a major artist of the 19th or 20th c. (e.g. Henri Matisse, Mark Rothko, Keith Haring) with current independent artists who share the artist’s style, subject, color palette, etc. Although there’s nothing wrong with enjoying print reproductions of famous artists, now you’ll have other enticing options to consider.

Please feel free to leave suggestions for future artists. Thanks!

If you like O’Keeffe’s flowers…

…then you might just like the work of Faith Evans-Sills, Rachel Ann Austin or Yellena James.


If you like O’Keeffe’s abstracts…

…then you might like the work of Julie Evans, Sophia Brueckner or Serena Mitnik-Miller.


And if you like O’Keeffe’s architectural work…

…you might like work by Laura Marie Walker, Ryan Kapp or Kari Maxwell.